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It’s National Devil’s Food Cake Day!

May 19, 2010

May 19: National Devil's Food Cake Day.

 

Chocolate lovers rejoice!   

In our little chocolate-loving, hearts-of-hearts, we’re so glad there is a day set aside just for devil’s food cake. Our mouths water thinking about its moist sweetness–not too cloying, not to bitter,  just right. It’s made even better by those delightful endorphins chocolate releases into our systems. (Eating chocolate sometimes just feels so good.)   

While thinking about Devil’s Food Cake and an appropriate recipe for our celebration, we came upon this recipe at bonappetite.com. We tweaked it, baked it and, oh, my … it is “goodness” (or “devilishness”?)  indeed! So, without further delay …  

Wholesome’s Devil’s Food Cake
(featuring Fair Trade Organic Brown Sugar and Organic Vanilla Flavored Blue Agave)  

INGREDIENTS (we always recommend Fair Trade Certified and Organic or sustainably produced ingredients)   

Cake   

Frosting   

  • 8 ounces high-quality milk chocolate, chopped
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter (if you’re feeling especially indulgent, use plugra butter–it has a higher fat content than regular butter)
  • 2/3 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon Wholesome Sweeteners Vanilla Flavored Organic Blue Agave Syrup
  • Organically grown edible flowers (roses are especially lovely!)

Equipment   

  • Two 5″ dia x 2″ deep cake pans
  • Whisks
  • Electric mixer (while a stand mixer is convenient, it’s not necessary for this recipe)
  • No-stick cooking spray
  • Parchment paper

    

To make the cake:   

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.  Spray (or butter) the pans. Line the bottom of the pans with 5″ discs of parchment paper and spray those, too.   

Combine cocoa powder and milk chocolate in a medium bowl. Add 1/4 cup boiling water. Stir until the milk chocolate has completely melted. Whisk in buttermilk.   

In a medium bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, and salt. Using an electric mixer, beat the brown sugar, blue agave syrup, oil, and egg in a large mixing bowl. Add the flour and chocolate, and mix until smooth. (The batter will be thin.) Pour the batter evenly into the two pans and tap the pans gently on the counter top to help release any air bubbles.   

Bake the cakes in the middle of the oven for 30-35 minutes, or until a toothpick test yields a few crumbs on the stick (a clean, dry stick will mean a dry cake). Cool pans on a rack for 15 minutes, then turn the cakes out and remove the parchment.  Turn the cakes over again and cool completely.   

To make the frosting:   

Place the milk chocolate in a double boiler (or make your own but simply placing a metal or Pyrex bowl over a boiling pot of water–be sure the bowl’s rim is wider than the pot’s rim, and that the bowl doesn’t slosh boiling water over the pot’s edges).  Stir until the chocolate is completely melted. Remove the pan (or bowl) from the boiling pot. Add the butter, and stir again until melted and mixed. Add the sour cream and blue agave syrup and continue stirring until well blended. Let the frosting cool to room temperature.   

Using a serrated knife, cut the rounded tops off the cakes, leveling their tops. Then cut each of the cakes horizontally into two layers.  Place a bottom layer on a cake plate, then spread about 1/4 cup of the frosting on it (try to leave about a half-inch unfrosted border on each layer), then add the top half of the same cake and frost, repeat with the second cake to build a four-layered cake. Spread about 1/3 cup frosting over the cake’s top and sides. Set in the refrigerator and chill until the frosting sets, at least 30 minutes, then spread the remaining frosting over the base frosting layer.   

 Serves 6-8.   

If you’re in the mood to play … spice it up by adding a little cinnamon or cayenne pepper to the flour mix, or use Wholesome’s Cinnamon Agave instead of Vanilla Agave.   

Many thanks to Bonappetit.com and Rochelle Palermo for providing such devilish inspiration.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Francis Jiffre Linguaje permalink
    May 24, 2012 8:15 pm

    wholesome sweeteners rule

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